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Mental Illness Again Implicated in Violence

8/28/2018        In the News 2 Comments

Mental Illness Again Implicated in Violence


David Katz, the Jacksonville shooter, is the latest in a long line of scapegoats for an apparent epidemic of violence. Just this past Sunday he opened fire at a e-sports tournament, wounding 10 and killing three, including himself. Katz' motives are still under investigation, but people are already implicating the bogeyman of mental illness. See CNN's reporting today - Jacksonville shooter had a history of mental illness and police visits to family home.

According to the report, Katz was prescribed "a number of psychiatric medications," including antidepressants and antipsychotics. He also was said to have seen "a succession of psychiatrists." These statements imply that Katz' a mysterious alien entity residing with him, called "mental illness," was the culprit. There is even current quibbling over what the "correct" diagnosis was.

A more reasonable explanation would be that Katz had been struggling with several real personal dilemmas, he wasn't infected with a nonsensical illness of the mind. Just one example is that he had to witness his parents' vicious divorce and custody battle over him. Instead of following the suggestion of his father for peer-based support group assistance during middle school, there was the default turn toward psychiatric treatment, as if there was something in him to truly treat via medical means.

If the treatment went as it typically does, this would have meant increasing focus on him as the problem, rather than his circumstances. Being subjected to a "succession of psychiatrists" means that one superficial attempt after another didn't work, so he was shuffled to the next psychiatrist in line. He likely felt the increasing sense of being misunderstood and persecute by those medical attempts to sedate him.

This is just the last in a long and continuing line of horrific episodes. It will continue. It will continue because the authorities are not looking at the causes of these events. They are trying to find a scapegoat. Three hundred years ago that scapegoat would have been witchcraft or demons. Now, it is the internal infection of "mental illness."

To make matters worse, the alleged treatment for that infection is typically to coerce the person into compliance. In other words, it is to get them to stop complaining about the problems (euphemistically called "symptoms reduction"). And the icing on the cake is that psychiatric drugging into a state of agitation clearly increases the chances of impulsive outbursts of violence. See ISEPP's White Paper on the link between psychiatric drugs and violence.

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

  • Yup. I agree, too, from my own direct personal experience. My parents took me to a psychiatrist in 10th grade, where I got a bogus "diagnosis", and a prescription for powerful psych drugs. Most of my so-called "symptoms" didn't occur until AFTER I was on the psych drugs, and that was used to "confirm" the "diagnosis". I totally believed the lies I was told. I'm glad that it wasn't worse than it was. I was told by several psychiatrists that I "would needs these drugs the rest of my life". That's almost true. If I had stayed with psychiatry, I'd probably be dead long ago. But today, well over 20 years psych drug free, I'm more whole, healthy, and happy than ever. Without going into too much detail, *YES*, psych drugs are CAUSING most of the violence, and they are behind ALL of the mass-casualty school shooters. I saw that in myself, and I still see it today in society at large. Psychiatry and it's poison pills have done, and continue to do, far more harm than good. BTW, what happened to my "mental illness"? It went away, when I GREW UP!

  • Psychiatry actually causes more problems than it solves. Though the main effects of psychiatric drugs are physical and mental suppression, these oppressive drugs actually increase the risks of explosive violence, through a paradoxical syndrome called "akathisia", which is characterized by a sense of internal restlessness combined with impulsivity. Then, psychiatrists claim that they "need" more money for "mental health care" when that really caused the problem. Throwing away more money at psychiatry is just going to make things worse.

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